Marta’s guidebook

Marta
Marta’s guidebook

Neighborhoods

Lake Merritt is an idyllic parkland with expansive lawns, groves of luxuriant trees, and pleasant picnic areas. This lush green space offers an oasis of tranquility in the heart of the city. Locals flock here to relax and socialize. The Lakeside Park at Lake Merritt features seven acres of beautiful themed gardens, including a Bonsai Garden; the fragrant Sensory Garden, planted with aromatic plants such as lavender, oregano, rosemary, and Grecian bay trees; an Edible Garden that demonstrates how to grow organic vegetables; and a lovely Mediterranean Garden that centers around a historic fountain. Within Lakeside Park is Children's Fairyland, a storybook-themed attraction that is one of the best places to visit in the area for families with young children. Surrounding the lake's shoreline within Lakeside Park is a three-mile path for walking and jogging. Other things to do include bird-watching and water sports. Visitors can rent canoes, kayaks, row boats, or pedal boats by the hour from the Lake Merritt Sailboat House during spring, summer, and fall. It's also possible to take a gondola ride across the lake. Lakeside Park is also home to a wildlife sanctuary. Because the lake is a tidal lagoon filled with seawater, it attracts a marvelous variety of birdlife such as Canadian geese, pelicans, the snowy egret, and black cormorants. Established in 1870, this is also the oldest designated wildlife refuge in the country. The last surviving of the beautiful Victorian mansions that graced the banks of Lake Merritt in the late 19th century, the Camron-Stanford House, is open to the public for guided tours on Sundays. Built in 1876, the Camron-Stanford House features elegant period decor. Offering a chance to experience the lifestyle of the Victorian era, the Camron-Stanford House hosts themed tea parties throughout the year. The traditional English afternoon tea is served in a lovely dining room (reservations are required well in advance). For those seeking a good meal in a pleasant setting, the Lake Chalet restaurant treats guests to delicious California cuisine and delightful outdoor seating with waterfront views. The restaurant also hosts music concerts on the dock during summertime.
Lake Merritt Boulevard
Lake Merritt is an idyllic parkland with expansive lawns, groves of luxuriant trees, and pleasant picnic areas. This lush green space offers an oasis of tranquility in the heart of the city. Locals flock here to relax and socialize. The Lakeside Park at Lake Merritt features seven acres of beautiful themed gardens, including a Bonsai Garden; the fragrant Sensory Garden, planted with aromatic plants such as lavender, oregano, rosemary, and Grecian bay trees; an Edible Garden that demonstrates how to grow organic vegetables; and a lovely Mediterranean Garden that centers around a historic fountain. Within Lakeside Park is Children's Fairyland, a storybook-themed attraction that is one of the best places to visit in the area for families with young children. Surrounding the lake's shoreline within Lakeside Park is a three-mile path for walking and jogging. Other things to do include bird-watching and water sports. Visitors can rent canoes, kayaks, row boats, or pedal boats by the hour from the Lake Merritt Sailboat House during spring, summer, and fall. It's also possible to take a gondola ride across the lake. Lakeside Park is also home to a wildlife sanctuary. Because the lake is a tidal lagoon filled with seawater, it attracts a marvelous variety of birdlife such as Canadian geese, pelicans, the snowy egret, and black cormorants. Established in 1870, this is also the oldest designated wildlife refuge in the country. The last surviving of the beautiful Victorian mansions that graced the banks of Lake Merritt in the late 19th century, the Camron-Stanford House, is open to the public for guided tours on Sundays. Built in 1876, the Camron-Stanford House features elegant period decor. Offering a chance to experience the lifestyle of the Victorian era, the Camron-Stanford House hosts themed tea parties throughout the year. The traditional English afternoon tea is served in a lovely dining room (reservations are required well in advance). For those seeking a good meal in a pleasant setting, the Lake Chalet restaurant treats guests to delicious California cuisine and delightful outdoor seating with waterfront views. The restaurant also hosts music concerts on the dock during summertime.
Dining & Shopping in Rockridge & Temescal Oakland's trendy Temescal neighborhood caters to a diverse crowd of foodies, hipsters, techies, and young families. This area has a top-notch dining scene that rivals the Gourmet Ghetto in Berkeley. The main drag of Temescal is Telegraph Avenue, with many excellent ethnic restaurants and pizza places found in the area around 48 Street to 52nd Street. Just off Telegraph Avenue on 49th Street are two charming pedestrian alleyways with locally owned specialty boutiques and artisan shops. One of the neighborhood's most popular dining options, Pizzaiolo (5008 Telegraph Avenue at 50th Street) specializes in seasonal Italian cuisine and authentic wood-fire oven-baked pizzas. In the historic horse stables and carriage houses of Temescal Alley (as well as the nearby Alley 49), visitors will now find a favorite ice-cream parlor (Curbside Creamery), stylish clothing stores, boutiques selling handcrafted jewelry, and an old-fashioned barber shop. The Temescal Farmers' Market takes place in Temescal Alley everyday Sunday from 9am to 1pm year-round. The Rockridge neighborhood has a great selection of restaurants along College Avenue, between Florio Street and Bryant Avenue. This neighborhood is also full of locally owned boutiques, artisan coffee shops, casual American-style cafés, stylish French bistros, and authentic ethnic restaurants.
53 locals recommend
Temescal
53 locals recommend
Dining & Shopping in Rockridge & Temescal Oakland's trendy Temescal neighborhood caters to a diverse crowd of foodies, hipsters, techies, and young families. This area has a top-notch dining scene that rivals the Gourmet Ghetto in Berkeley. The main drag of Temescal is Telegraph Avenue, with many excellent ethnic restaurants and pizza places found in the area around 48 Street to 52nd Street. Just off Telegraph Avenue on 49th Street are two charming pedestrian alleyways with locally owned specialty boutiques and artisan shops. One of the neighborhood's most popular dining options, Pizzaiolo (5008 Telegraph Avenue at 50th Street) specializes in seasonal Italian cuisine and authentic wood-fire oven-baked pizzas. In the historic horse stables and carriage houses of Temescal Alley (as well as the nearby Alley 49), visitors will now find a favorite ice-cream parlor (Curbside Creamery), stylish clothing stores, boutiques selling handcrafted jewelry, and an old-fashioned barber shop. The Temescal Farmers' Market takes place in Temescal Alley everyday Sunday from 9am to 1pm year-round. The Rockridge neighborhood has a great selection of restaurants along College Avenue, between Florio Street and Bryant Avenue. This neighborhood is also full of locally owned boutiques, artisan coffee shops, casual American-style cafés, stylish French bistros, and authentic ethnic restaurants.
One of the oldest Chinatowns in the United States, Chinatown Oakland was settled in the 1850s, shortly after the gold rush. No longer just Chinese, this 16-block area is Pan Asian, with Koreans, Vietnamese and Japanese.
40 locals recommend
Chinatown
40 locals recommend
One of the oldest Chinatowns in the United States, Chinatown Oakland was settled in the 1850s, shortly after the gold rush. No longer just Chinese, this 16-block area is Pan Asian, with Koreans, Vietnamese and Japanese.
This quiet, residential stretch at the base of the Oakland Hills has a strong Latino culture and refreshingly unpretentious vibe, with almost zero craft cocktail bars or bicycle-powered coffee machines.
8 locals recommend
Dimond District
8 locals recommend
This quiet, residential stretch at the base of the Oakland Hills has a strong Latino culture and refreshingly unpretentious vibe, with almost zero craft cocktail bars or bicycle-powered coffee machines.
The vibe To say Downtown Oakland is eclectic and diverse would barely skim the surface of this melting pot. You’re just as likely to bump into a scholar, a Federal judge, a tech entrepreneur and a civil rights activist in a one-block area. Just five years ago, a swath of the area’s Victorian and Art Deco storefronts were vacant and in need of repair. Now they are renovated and lit up with cool shops like Umami (selling Japanese barware), Oaklandish (details below), and art pioneer Joyce Gordon Gallery. Downtown is peppered with architectural marvels: the African American Museum and Library in a 1902 Carnegie; the Pardee Home, dating back to 1868; and the Rotunda Building, a massive elliptical dome in the heart of the district. Different than other downtowns, Oakland’s isn’t about just business. Downtown Oakland is a vital crossroads, where all the cultures meet, eat and sleep. Many murals around the streets tell the stories of the people and of their plights. The inside inside scoop Time to let out your inner gamer—video game connoisseurs will feel at home at the Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment (MADE). Go deep into the collection of playable video games and game history, or check out one of the weekday events on the calendar. If you only have three hours Take a time capsule into the late 1800s at Preservation Park, a gated area that preserves 16 Victorian structures. The buildings are private offices and event spaces, but you can grab a bite at the Brazilian Rio California cafe. Order the Jerk Chicken and sit on their Victorian deck, or by the iconic Parisian fountain in the center of the park. The 12-city block City Center complex in the midst of downtown is a heavyweight, with a conference center, hotel, parking garage, restaurants, racquet club and BART in the basement. Free noontime concerts are held throughout the year. Give Oakland a huge hug by shopping (and buying) branded gear from the 800-square-foot Oaklandish. Wearing one of these shirts is a mark of your Town pride, and a portion of proceeds benefit community projects. Get a taste of the local licks at Awaken Café.
Downtown
The vibe To say Downtown Oakland is eclectic and diverse would barely skim the surface of this melting pot. You’re just as likely to bump into a scholar, a Federal judge, a tech entrepreneur and a civil rights activist in a one-block area. Just five years ago, a swath of the area’s Victorian and Art Deco storefronts were vacant and in need of repair. Now they are renovated and lit up with cool shops like Umami (selling Japanese barware), Oaklandish (details below), and art pioneer Joyce Gordon Gallery. Downtown is peppered with architectural marvels: the African American Museum and Library in a 1902 Carnegie; the Pardee Home, dating back to 1868; and the Rotunda Building, a massive elliptical dome in the heart of the district. Different than other downtowns, Oakland’s isn’t about just business. Downtown Oakland is a vital crossroads, where all the cultures meet, eat and sleep. Many murals around the streets tell the stories of the people and of their plights. The inside inside scoop Time to let out your inner gamer—video game connoisseurs will feel at home at the Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment (MADE). Go deep into the collection of playable video games and game history, or check out one of the weekday events on the calendar. If you only have three hours Take a time capsule into the late 1800s at Preservation Park, a gated area that preserves 16 Victorian structures. The buildings are private offices and event spaces, but you can grab a bite at the Brazilian Rio California cafe. Order the Jerk Chicken and sit on their Victorian deck, or by the iconic Parisian fountain in the center of the park. The 12-city block City Center complex in the midst of downtown is a heavyweight, with a conference center, hotel, parking garage, restaurants, racquet club and BART in the basement. Free noontime concerts are held throughout the year. Give Oakland a huge hug by shopping (and buying) branded gear from the 800-square-foot Oaklandish. Wearing one of these shirts is a mark of your Town pride, and a portion of proceeds benefit community projects. Get a taste of the local licks at Awaken Café.
The vibe This urban stretch at the base of the Oakland Hills that once a land of, you guessed it, fruit trees, became a center for the Chicano Movement in the late 1960s and 70s, including the Brown Berets. Today, the population is almost half Hispanic with a solidly preserved culture and village-y vibe centered around International Blvd. As you can imagine, Cinco de Mayo and Dia de los Muertos are big days on these streets. But visit any day of the week—you’ll find a vibrant community awaits you. The inside inside scoop Start taco-hopping in the area that has the highest density of taco food trucks. Some hot spots are the Goodwill parking lot for Mi Grullense, and International Blvd and 22nd for Tacos Sinaloa. If you only have three hours Get a little taste of what a day at the Peralta Hacienda might have been like, way back in the 70s. In 1870, that is. The Italianate house that belonged to the Californios’ family is on the National Register of Historic Places and part of the Peralta Hacienda Historical Park. Tours take place Wednesday-Saturday. Boarding Fruitvale is Jingletown, an artsy neighborhood along the estuary. Here, the Chthonic Theater holds two annual parades that anyone can participate in. Or just be a bystander, if that’s more your style. Spend an hour or so mural hunting along Rue de Merde, an open-street path with nearly a dozen vibrant murals and mosaics. The Institute of Mosaic Art rotates exhibits and has a mosaic supply store. Take a class from a local expert.
Fruitvale
The vibe This urban stretch at the base of the Oakland Hills that once a land of, you guessed it, fruit trees, became a center for the Chicano Movement in the late 1960s and 70s, including the Brown Berets. Today, the population is almost half Hispanic with a solidly preserved culture and village-y vibe centered around International Blvd. As you can imagine, Cinco de Mayo and Dia de los Muertos are big days on these streets. But visit any day of the week—you’ll find a vibrant community awaits you. The inside inside scoop Start taco-hopping in the area that has the highest density of taco food trucks. Some hot spots are the Goodwill parking lot for Mi Grullense, and International Blvd and 22nd for Tacos Sinaloa. If you only have three hours Get a little taste of what a day at the Peralta Hacienda might have been like, way back in the 70s. In 1870, that is. The Italianate house that belonged to the Californios’ family is on the National Register of Historic Places and part of the Peralta Hacienda Historical Park. Tours take place Wednesday-Saturday. Boarding Fruitvale is Jingletown, an artsy neighborhood along the estuary. Here, the Chthonic Theater holds two annual parades that anyone can participate in. Or just be a bystander, if that’s more your style. Spend an hour or so mural hunting along Rue de Merde, an open-street path with nearly a dozen vibrant murals and mosaics. The Institute of Mosaic Art rotates exhibits and has a mosaic supply store. Take a class from a local expert.
The vibe A sweet neighborhood of California bungalows in the lower Oakland Hills, Glenview feels more like a very quiet Rockridge with a couple good restaurants and well-manicured gardens. The main strip of Park Boulevard is pretty much where anything happens now and where it happened then: More than a century ago, the now bustling street was a path where redwoods traveled to get from where they were felled to the lumberyard. The elementary school is Art Deco, built in 1927; and the local breakfast joint serves dishes like eggs (and grits!) till 3:30 p.m. on the weekends. A lazy slice of California. The inside inside scoop The historic Leimert Bridge, a bit in Trestle Glen neighborhood territory (but don’t worry, there’s no border patrol), has nice views of the Bay. If you only have three hours Go for a walk in Dimond Park and cruise by Sausal Creek, the Lions Pool, and the oldest oak tree in Oakland. The southern entrance to Dimond Park is at MacArthur and Dimond (Dimond dead ends at Park). You can also start at the Dimond Canyon Trail, just east of Park Boulevard, off the woodsy El Centro Avenue. For a taste of a great Oakland restaurants, Rumbo Al Sur is a sister restaurant to the immensely popular À Côté in Rockridge—only it’s a Latin American menu (not French), with pig roasts and Tuesday taco nights. Then, there’s Bellanico, a sister restaurant to Aperto in San Francisco, with a busy wine bar and popular pasta dishes. How to get here Freeway exit: From 1-580 E, take MacArthur Blvd. toward Park Blvd.; From 1-580 W, exit at 14th Avenue/Park Blvd.
Glenview
The vibe A sweet neighborhood of California bungalows in the lower Oakland Hills, Glenview feels more like a very quiet Rockridge with a couple good restaurants and well-manicured gardens. The main strip of Park Boulevard is pretty much where anything happens now and where it happened then: More than a century ago, the now bustling street was a path where redwoods traveled to get from where they were felled to the lumberyard. The elementary school is Art Deco, built in 1927; and the local breakfast joint serves dishes like eggs (and grits!) till 3:30 p.m. on the weekends. A lazy slice of California. The inside inside scoop The historic Leimert Bridge, a bit in Trestle Glen neighborhood territory (but don’t worry, there’s no border patrol), has nice views of the Bay. If you only have three hours Go for a walk in Dimond Park and cruise by Sausal Creek, the Lions Pool, and the oldest oak tree in Oakland. The southern entrance to Dimond Park is at MacArthur and Dimond (Dimond dead ends at Park). You can also start at the Dimond Canyon Trail, just east of Park Boulevard, off the woodsy El Centro Avenue. For a taste of a great Oakland restaurants, Rumbo Al Sur is a sister restaurant to the immensely popular À Côté in Rockridge—only it’s a Latin American menu (not French), with pig roasts and Tuesday taco nights. Then, there’s Bellanico, a sister restaurant to Aperto in San Francisco, with a busy wine bar and popular pasta dishes. How to get here Freeway exit: From 1-580 E, take MacArthur Blvd. toward Park Blvd.; From 1-580 W, exit at 14th Avenue/Park Blvd.
Montclair and Oakland Hills Just the facts Main strip: Mountain Blvd. Who dwells here: Young families, empty nesters Population: 4,015 >> Founded: Late 1800s Main architecture: Storybook cottages, manicured manses Neighborhood giant: Montclair Village Well-known resident: Governor Jerry Brown Where to mingle with locals: Montclair Village, Montclair Egg Shop, Farmstead Cheeses & Wine, Joaquin Miller Park The vibe Perhaps one of the biggest signposts of being in Montclair and the Oakland Hills is the squiggly (dare we say, hairpin?) roads and scenery re-set from urban to forestry. This wealthy outpost, just off Highway 13, contains some of the most coveted real estate in the Bay Area. You won’t find industrial restaurant décor or mustachioed baristas in this pedestrian-friendly village, exuding a Bavarian mountain town vibe. Montclair also happens to be a terrific launching point into Oakland’s wilderness; some of the East Bay’s best hiking is found in nearby Redwood Regional and Joaquin Miller parks, and other gems like Chabot Space & Science Center are tucked away in the hills. The inside scoop On Saturdays, $1 gets you a flight of wine—and a dose of goodwill—at Farmstead Cheeses, which donates tasting proceeds to local schools. If you only have three hours Wilderness is so close, you can pick it up behind the Montclair Parking Garage. The Montclair Railroad trailhead here leads into a former rail bed that winds through the hills just above the village. Adding to the whimsical nature of this neighborhood, Montclair is the only Oakland district with both a storybook firehouse and library. Check out the hobbit-style structures on your way to a musical at Oakland’s outdoor amphitheater, Woodminster. There are about 100 retailers in the village, but if you need to narrow down your selections, two indie bookstores worth a visit are across the street from one another: A Great Place for Books and The Book Tree. For fun home and gifty items, Pelago may be your jam. How to get here Freeway exit: From 1-580 W, take the Park Blvd. exit from Highway 13; from 1-80 E, take CA-24 E to Moraga Ave. Various exit options can be found at the Montclair Village site.
Montclair
Montclair and Oakland Hills Just the facts Main strip: Mountain Blvd. Who dwells here: Young families, empty nesters Population: 4,015 >> Founded: Late 1800s Main architecture: Storybook cottages, manicured manses Neighborhood giant: Montclair Village Well-known resident: Governor Jerry Brown Where to mingle with locals: Montclair Village, Montclair Egg Shop, Farmstead Cheeses & Wine, Joaquin Miller Park The vibe Perhaps one of the biggest signposts of being in Montclair and the Oakland Hills is the squiggly (dare we say, hairpin?) roads and scenery re-set from urban to forestry. This wealthy outpost, just off Highway 13, contains some of the most coveted real estate in the Bay Area. You won’t find industrial restaurant décor or mustachioed baristas in this pedestrian-friendly village, exuding a Bavarian mountain town vibe. Montclair also happens to be a terrific launching point into Oakland’s wilderness; some of the East Bay’s best hiking is found in nearby Redwood Regional and Joaquin Miller parks, and other gems like Chabot Space & Science Center are tucked away in the hills. The inside scoop On Saturdays, $1 gets you a flight of wine—and a dose of goodwill—at Farmstead Cheeses, which donates tasting proceeds to local schools. If you only have three hours Wilderness is so close, you can pick it up behind the Montclair Parking Garage. The Montclair Railroad trailhead here leads into a former rail bed that winds through the hills just above the village. Adding to the whimsical nature of this neighborhood, Montclair is the only Oakland district with both a storybook firehouse and library. Check out the hobbit-style structures on your way to a musical at Oakland’s outdoor amphitheater, Woodminster. There are about 100 retailers in the village, but if you need to narrow down your selections, two indie bookstores worth a visit are across the street from one another: A Great Place for Books and The Book Tree. For fun home and gifty items, Pelago may be your jam. How to get here Freeway exit: From 1-580 W, take the Park Blvd. exit from Highway 13; from 1-80 E, take CA-24 E to Moraga Ave. Various exit options can be found at the Montclair Village site.
Just the facts Main strip: Piedmont Avenue Who dwells here: Grad students, dog-walking couples, families galore Population: 6,578 (including the greater Piedmont area) Founded: Late 1800s Architecture: Stately manors, Craftsman Neighborhood giants: Julia Morgan-designed Chapel of the Chimes and Frederick Law Olmsted’s Mountain View Cemetery Best ode to a potato: Gregoire’s crispy potato puff Where to mingle with locals: Fentons Creamery, Gaylord’s Caffe Espresso, Piedmont Theatre The vibe Not to be confused with Piedmont, a small city in Alameda County, Piedmont Avenue is one long badass sidewalk of restaurants, shops and home bric-a-brac, stacked side by side, with nearly nothing vacant. Choices range from family-friendly, 1894-founded Fentons Creamery, which made a cameo in Pixar’s Up, and the Michelin-starred Commis (2009). Indie films screen at Oakland’s longest running cinema (1917), the Piedmont Theatre, while at the more modern Cato’s Ale House, sports screen on TVs as taps pour craft beers. Despite being part of the big city and having a high density of stores, Piedmont Avenue is very small-town, with a genuine magazine stand (Issues), a sewing shop with lessons (Sew Images) and a tobacconist (Piedmont Tobacconist). It’s a model street. The inside inside scoop At popular Piedmont Springs, outdoor tubs are kept at about 102 degrees. The open-air combo room has views of the sky (or stars) from the redwood tub. If you only have three hours Like unsolved mysteries and old cemeteries? Good news—Piedmont Avenue dead ends at the 226-acre Mountain View Cemetery designed in 1863 by famed landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, who also designed New York’s Central Park. Because there’s so much of interest, docents lead tours on certain days of the month. Famous burials include Julia Morgan, Samuel Merritt, and Elizabeth Short (known as the Black Dahlia, a victim of an unsolved murder in 1947). The Julia Morgan redesigned Chapel of the Chimes hosts a series called Jazz at the Chimes, where Bay Area musicians play in the designated, very well acoustic’ed landmark. Attendees can tour the chapel and cloisters pre and post show. Shopping is dense with a nice distribution of antiques and vintage with quirk. Mercy Vintage is a well curated selection of designer vintage and unusual—same goes for Pimlico, only the focus is on accessories, like handbags. How to get here Freeway exit: Broadway Auto Row/Webster Street from I-580 E
56 locals recommend
Piedmont Avenue
56 locals recommend
Just the facts Main strip: Piedmont Avenue Who dwells here: Grad students, dog-walking couples, families galore Population: 6,578 (including the greater Piedmont area) Founded: Late 1800s Architecture: Stately manors, Craftsman Neighborhood giants: Julia Morgan-designed Chapel of the Chimes and Frederick Law Olmsted’s Mountain View Cemetery Best ode to a potato: Gregoire’s crispy potato puff Where to mingle with locals: Fentons Creamery, Gaylord’s Caffe Espresso, Piedmont Theatre The vibe Not to be confused with Piedmont, a small city in Alameda County, Piedmont Avenue is one long badass sidewalk of restaurants, shops and home bric-a-brac, stacked side by side, with nearly nothing vacant. Choices range from family-friendly, 1894-founded Fentons Creamery, which made a cameo in Pixar’s Up, and the Michelin-starred Commis (2009). Indie films screen at Oakland’s longest running cinema (1917), the Piedmont Theatre, while at the more modern Cato’s Ale House, sports screen on TVs as taps pour craft beers. Despite being part of the big city and having a high density of stores, Piedmont Avenue is very small-town, with a genuine magazine stand (Issues), a sewing shop with lessons (Sew Images) and a tobacconist (Piedmont Tobacconist). It’s a model street. The inside inside scoop At popular Piedmont Springs, outdoor tubs are kept at about 102 degrees. The open-air combo room has views of the sky (or stars) from the redwood tub. If you only have three hours Like unsolved mysteries and old cemeteries? Good news—Piedmont Avenue dead ends at the 226-acre Mountain View Cemetery designed in 1863 by famed landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, who also designed New York’s Central Park. Because there’s so much of interest, docents lead tours on certain days of the month. Famous burials include Julia Morgan, Samuel Merritt, and Elizabeth Short (known as the Black Dahlia, a victim of an unsolved murder in 1947). The Julia Morgan redesigned Chapel of the Chimes hosts a series called Jazz at the Chimes, where Bay Area musicians play in the designated, very well acoustic’ed landmark. Attendees can tour the chapel and cloisters pre and post show. Shopping is dense with a nice distribution of antiques and vintage with quirk. Mercy Vintage is a well curated selection of designer vintage and unusual—same goes for Pimlico, only the focus is on accessories, like handbags. How to get here Freeway exit: Broadway Auto Row/Webster Street from I-580 E
Just the facts Main strip: College Avenue Who dwells here: Former Cal Berkeley grads and city-folk raising families in this upscale bungalowville Population: 4,000 Founded: Early 1900s Main architecture: California bungalows built in the early 20th century Neighborhood giant: Market Hall Best burger: Wood Tavern Where to mingle with locals: Cole Coffee, Market Hall, Á Côté, Diesel Books The vibe At the foot of the Oakland Hills, Rockridge is a lovely burby-like haven where Cal Berkeley grads come to live when they exit their 20s and start yearning for historic cottages, nice gardens, and a 86 walk score. Twitterites and techies who have newly flown the coop are lucky to nab a place to live in this desirable hub. Even so, all ages come to explore this model main street where two indie bookstores thrive (Pegasus and Diesel). Extreme shoppers and companions of extreme shoppers should be warned: walking Rockridge will easily swallow an afternoon. There are home goods (Maison D’Etre) to baked goods (Market Hall Bakery), vintage (Pretty Penny, Lost & Found) to eco (Atomic Garden), jewels (Pavé) to shoes (Tootsies). A break for sustenance is always a storefront away with a dozen new eateries in 2013 alone, including Ramen Shop and A16 Rockridge. Oldies but goodies are Wood Tavern, Á Côté, and Dreyer’s Ice Cream Parlor, where the flavor Rocky Road was invented. The inside inside scoop The 2,000 hand-painted tiles in the Rockridge BART station form a mural that depicts the Oakland hills firestorm of 1991 as remembered by the survivors. If you only have three hours Market Hall is like Whole Foods but more neighborhoody, more curated. It has a butcher, seafood counter, deli, florist, tea shop, and a cheesemonger. Grab a pie at Zachary’s to participate in the cornmeal-crust pizza warfare between this Rockridge institution and its San Francisco nemesis, Little Star. It’s a whole thing. Frog Park is a tucked-away walking path that curves through a kind-of-hidden greenbelt of redwood trees and the Temescal Creek bed. How to get here Freeway exit: From 1-80 E, take the exit toward CA-13 N/Berkeley/Broadway from CA-24 E
62 locals recommend
Rockridge
62 locals recommend
Just the facts Main strip: College Avenue Who dwells here: Former Cal Berkeley grads and city-folk raising families in this upscale bungalowville Population: 4,000 Founded: Early 1900s Main architecture: California bungalows built in the early 20th century Neighborhood giant: Market Hall Best burger: Wood Tavern Where to mingle with locals: Cole Coffee, Market Hall, Á Côté, Diesel Books The vibe At the foot of the Oakland Hills, Rockridge is a lovely burby-like haven where Cal Berkeley grads come to live when they exit their 20s and start yearning for historic cottages, nice gardens, and a 86 walk score. Twitterites and techies who have newly flown the coop are lucky to nab a place to live in this desirable hub. Even so, all ages come to explore this model main street where two indie bookstores thrive (Pegasus and Diesel). Extreme shoppers and companions of extreme shoppers should be warned: walking Rockridge will easily swallow an afternoon. There are home goods (Maison D’Etre) to baked goods (Market Hall Bakery), vintage (Pretty Penny, Lost & Found) to eco (Atomic Garden), jewels (Pavé) to shoes (Tootsies). A break for sustenance is always a storefront away with a dozen new eateries in 2013 alone, including Ramen Shop and A16 Rockridge. Oldies but goodies are Wood Tavern, Á Côté, and Dreyer’s Ice Cream Parlor, where the flavor Rocky Road was invented. The inside inside scoop The 2,000 hand-painted tiles in the Rockridge BART station form a mural that depicts the Oakland hills firestorm of 1991 as remembered by the survivors. If you only have three hours Market Hall is like Whole Foods but more neighborhoody, more curated. It has a butcher, seafood counter, deli, florist, tea shop, and a cheesemonger. Grab a pie at Zachary’s to participate in the cornmeal-crust pizza warfare between this Rockridge institution and its San Francisco nemesis, Little Star. It’s a whole thing. Frog Park is a tucked-away walking path that curves through a kind-of-hidden greenbelt of redwood trees and the Temescal Creek bed. How to get here Freeway exit: From 1-80 E, take the exit toward CA-13 N/Berkeley/Broadway from CA-24 E
Just the facts Main strip: Broadway and Telegraph (between 17th and 25th streets Who dwells here: hipsters, techies, student-artists, empty nesters Population: Exceeds 21,533, including neighboring areas Founded: 1900s Main architecture: Early to mid 1900s, with loads of Art Deco masterpieces Neighborhood giants: Paramount and Fox theaters Where to mingle with locals: Sweet Bar Bakery, the Bodega at Duende, Dogwood The vibe Once a shopping district in the early 20th century, Uptown is the hottest neighborhood in Oakland. A new restaurant, indie boutique, or bar seemingly opens every other week, with nearly 125 opened in the past decade. Billed as the arts and entertainment district of Oakland, it fulfills its promise, particularly during the boisterous Art Murmur on First Fridays. But the prettiest art may be the Art Deco buildings themselves, with the crown jewels being the show stopping Fox and the Paramount theaters. The former is mostly a live music venue; the latter channels its inner flapper often (classic movies with a live organ player). Art galleries, run by the artists or by volunteers, are opening in brick warehouses. Down side streets are scenes of the start-up, DIY revolution with co-ops, an urban winery, entrepreneur hubs, and creative centers. The inside inside scoop Tucked away on 26th street, Classic Cars West is home to a vintage and classic car sales and consignment, on site vegan restaurant and beer garden. If you only have three hours The drink to order at Cafe Van Kleef is the Greyhound. Yes, we know that sounds boring but there’s nothing ordinary about this beachy honky tonk bar, one of the original bars on Telegraph Avenue. The drink comes with a quarter of a grapefruit plunked in it. The decor is, um, mesmerizing. Atop a five-story garage that’s part of the Kaiser Center is three acres of greenery and a reflecting pond. It’s a nice place to take in the sunny Oakland weather. To avoid Art Murmur crowds, do the self-guided Saturday Stroll to many galleries, including 25th Street Collective, Creative Growth Art Center, and Vessel Gallery. How to get here Freeway exit: From 1-80 E, take I-880 S and continue on W Grand Ave; from 1-880 S, head north and take ramp right for Broadway toward Downtown, turning right onto Broadway. Bart stop: 19th Street
30 locals recommend
Uptown
30 locals recommend
Just the facts Main strip: Broadway and Telegraph (between 17th and 25th streets Who dwells here: hipsters, techies, student-artists, empty nesters Population: Exceeds 21,533, including neighboring areas Founded: 1900s Main architecture: Early to mid 1900s, with loads of Art Deco masterpieces Neighborhood giants: Paramount and Fox theaters Where to mingle with locals: Sweet Bar Bakery, the Bodega at Duende, Dogwood The vibe Once a shopping district in the early 20th century, Uptown is the hottest neighborhood in Oakland. A new restaurant, indie boutique, or bar seemingly opens every other week, with nearly 125 opened in the past decade. Billed as the arts and entertainment district of Oakland, it fulfills its promise, particularly during the boisterous Art Murmur on First Fridays. But the prettiest art may be the Art Deco buildings themselves, with the crown jewels being the show stopping Fox and the Paramount theaters. The former is mostly a live music venue; the latter channels its inner flapper often (classic movies with a live organ player). Art galleries, run by the artists or by volunteers, are opening in brick warehouses. Down side streets are scenes of the start-up, DIY revolution with co-ops, an urban winery, entrepreneur hubs, and creative centers. The inside inside scoop Tucked away on 26th street, Classic Cars West is home to a vintage and classic car sales and consignment, on site vegan restaurant and beer garden. If you only have three hours The drink to order at Cafe Van Kleef is the Greyhound. Yes, we know that sounds boring but there’s nothing ordinary about this beachy honky tonk bar, one of the original bars on Telegraph Avenue. The drink comes with a quarter of a grapefruit plunked in it. The decor is, um, mesmerizing. Atop a five-story garage that’s part of the Kaiser Center is three acres of greenery and a reflecting pond. It’s a nice place to take in the sunny Oakland weather. To avoid Art Murmur crowds, do the self-guided Saturday Stroll to many galleries, including 25th Street Collective, Creative Growth Art Center, and Vessel Gallery. How to get here Freeway exit: From 1-80 E, take I-880 S and continue on W Grand Ave; from 1-880 S, head north and take ramp right for Broadway toward Downtown, turning right onto Broadway. Bart stop: 19th Street
Just the facts Main strip: 7th Street Who dwells here: Working-class families, urban homesteaders, activists, artists Population: Approx. 32,000 Founded: Early 1800s Main architecture: Victorians, brick and corrugated warehouses Neighborhood giant: Port of Oakland Well-known residents: author Novella Carpenter, modern artist Bruce Beasley Where to mingle with locals: Old Kan & Beer Brewing Co., The Crucible and La Perla Taco Truck The vibe West Oakland has long been the neighborhood of Oakland with strong African American roots that earned a nickname Harlem of the West. Aretha Franklin, Billie Holiday and Big Mama Thornton among others had gigs along the 7th Street strip. Later, the Black Panthers set up HQ. Despite this Bluesy activist history, the neighborhood hit hard times. But today it’s undergoing a growth spurt driven by grassroots organizations. Newcomers co-mingle with the old guard to create unique fusions like the po’-mi sandwich at 10th and Wood restaurant (bah-mi + po-boy) and Seoul /Soul izakaya at FuseBox restaurant. Dilapidated Victorian mansions, once the home of sea captains, are being spit shined. Colorful street art decorates businesses. Civic pride runs high. The inside inside scoop Eat, drink and admire your surroundings at Oakland's self sustaining industrial park, O2 Artisans Aggregate. While many areas of the industrial park are not open to visitors, Soba Ichi, an authentic hand-made buckwheat soba noodle house, is open for dinner Wednesday-Sunday evenings. If you only have three hours Among a street of shipping containers and brick warehouses is the backyard work-area of folk-artist John Abduljaami who chainsaws figures from wood. Keep an eye out for some of his pieces at the Oakland Museum of California (located in Downtown near Lake Merritt). Old Kan & Beer Brewing Co., a brewery/restaurant by Michelin star chef James Syhabout, as is a wine tasting room by Campovida. Yes, there’s a beach in Oakland and it’s at Middle Harbor Shoreline Park, built on the site of the Oakland Naval Supply Depot. See the cranes that supposedly inspired the AT-AT Walkers in the Star Wars trilogy. Hungry for more? Pretty Lady is worth the wait. A diner where you can try American classics with a Korean twist. More places to eat & drink in West Oakland.
West Oakland
Just the facts Main strip: 7th Street Who dwells here: Working-class families, urban homesteaders, activists, artists Population: Approx. 32,000 Founded: Early 1800s Main architecture: Victorians, brick and corrugated warehouses Neighborhood giant: Port of Oakland Well-known residents: author Novella Carpenter, modern artist Bruce Beasley Where to mingle with locals: Old Kan & Beer Brewing Co., The Crucible and La Perla Taco Truck The vibe West Oakland has long been the neighborhood of Oakland with strong African American roots that earned a nickname Harlem of the West. Aretha Franklin, Billie Holiday and Big Mama Thornton among others had gigs along the 7th Street strip. Later, the Black Panthers set up HQ. Despite this Bluesy activist history, the neighborhood hit hard times. But today it’s undergoing a growth spurt driven by grassroots organizations. Newcomers co-mingle with the old guard to create unique fusions like the po’-mi sandwich at 10th and Wood restaurant (bah-mi + po-boy) and Seoul /Soul izakaya at FuseBox restaurant. Dilapidated Victorian mansions, once the home of sea captains, are being spit shined. Colorful street art decorates businesses. Civic pride runs high. The inside inside scoop Eat, drink and admire your surroundings at Oakland's self sustaining industrial park, O2 Artisans Aggregate. While many areas of the industrial park are not open to visitors, Soba Ichi, an authentic hand-made buckwheat soba noodle house, is open for dinner Wednesday-Sunday evenings. If you only have three hours Among a street of shipping containers and brick warehouses is the backyard work-area of folk-artist John Abduljaami who chainsaws figures from wood. Keep an eye out for some of his pieces at the Oakland Museum of California (located in Downtown near Lake Merritt). Old Kan & Beer Brewing Co., a brewery/restaurant by Michelin star chef James Syhabout, as is a wine tasting room by Campovida. Yes, there’s a beach in Oakland and it’s at Middle Harbor Shoreline Park, built on the site of the Oakland Naval Supply Depot. See the cranes that supposedly inspired the AT-AT Walkers in the Star Wars trilogy. Hungry for more? Pretty Lady is worth the wait. A diner where you can try American classics with a Korean twist. More places to eat & drink in West Oakland.

Sightseeing

Inside the 490-acre Knowland Park, the Oakland Zoo is home to over 850 native and exotic species residing in natural habitats, including an African savanna, tropical rain forest, and the Australian outback. For younger visitors and those who love to get up close, the Wayne and Gladys Valley Children's Zoo features an Otter Den and a Lily Pad Pond. Children love watching the animal feedings and also enjoy having the chance to pet friendly goats and sheep. Park visitors can get a bird's-eye view of the California Trail educational area and its herd of bison on a gondola that travels 650 feet above sea level, or hop on the Sky Ride that glides over the African savanna, home to giraffes, zebras, and elephants. The gondola ride ends up at the Landing Café, which serves artisanal pizzas, burgers, sandwiches and salads. From the café's outdoor deck, guests can admire sweeping views of the landscape. The zoo also has a carousel, a train that meanders through the park, a roller coaster, and other rides. In the rides area, visitors can grab snacks and quick meals at the Safari Café. Address: 9777 Golf Links Road, Oakland, California Official site: www.oaklandzoo.org
88 locals recommend
Oakland Zoo
9777 Golf Links Rd
88 locals recommend
Inside the 490-acre Knowland Park, the Oakland Zoo is home to over 850 native and exotic species residing in natural habitats, including an African savanna, tropical rain forest, and the Australian outback. For younger visitors and those who love to get up close, the Wayne and Gladys Valley Children's Zoo features an Otter Den and a Lily Pad Pond. Children love watching the animal feedings and also enjoy having the chance to pet friendly goats and sheep. Park visitors can get a bird's-eye view of the California Trail educational area and its herd of bison on a gondola that travels 650 feet above sea level, or hop on the Sky Ride that glides over the African savanna, home to giraffes, zebras, and elephants. The gondola ride ends up at the Landing Café, which serves artisanal pizzas, burgers, sandwiches and salads. From the café's outdoor deck, guests can admire sweeping views of the landscape. The zoo also has a carousel, a train that meanders through the park, a roller coaster, and other rides. In the rides area, visitors can grab snacks and quick meals at the Safari Café. Address: 9777 Golf Links Road, Oakland, California Official site: www.oaklandzoo.org
The Oakland Museum unveils the rich heritage and culture of California through its engaging exhibits and extensive permanent collection. The museum's galleries include areas dedicated to the natural sciences, California arts, and history of the state. This unique museum has a special focus on the Oakland community and often features exhibits related to the city's social justice movements, as well as the history of political activism. Highlights include the ongoing exhibit on Black Power, which provides a look at the city's Black Panther movement and illustrates the progress of Black anti-racist activism; on display is Black Panther Party leader Huey P. Newton's wicker chair. Every Friday night from 5pm to 9pm, tourists have a chance to combine a museum visit with entertainment while mingling with the local community. The Friday Nights at OMCA event offers late-night admission hours and the chance to grab a meal next to the museum at one of the gourmet food trucks (parked on 10th Street between Oak Street and Fallon Street). The museum has a garden and a café with an outdoor patio that serves lunch, coffee, snacks, and refreshments.
308 locals recommend
Oakland Museum of California
1000 Oak St
308 locals recommend
The Oakland Museum unveils the rich heritage and culture of California through its engaging exhibits and extensive permanent collection. The museum's galleries include areas dedicated to the natural sciences, California arts, and history of the state. This unique museum has a special focus on the Oakland community and often features exhibits related to the city's social justice movements, as well as the history of political activism. Highlights include the ongoing exhibit on Black Power, which provides a look at the city's Black Panther movement and illustrates the progress of Black anti-racist activism; on display is Black Panther Party leader Huey P. Newton's wicker chair. Every Friday night from 5pm to 9pm, tourists have a chance to combine a museum visit with entertainment while mingling with the local community. The Friday Nights at OMCA event offers late-night admission hours and the chance to grab a meal next to the museum at one of the gourmet food trucks (parked on 10th Street between Oak Street and Fallon Street). The museum has a garden and a café with an outdoor patio that serves lunch, coffee, snacks, and refreshments.
Adjacent to Lake Merritt's Lakeside Park, Children's Fairyland has been entertaining young children since 1950 with a variety of attractions on the theme of classic fairy tales. This whimsical amusement park is known to have inspired Walt Disney. Fairyland is famous for its Storybook Puppet Theater, the oldest continuously operating puppet theater in the United States. The theater brings puppet dramas to life with charming costumes, colorful sets, and music. The puppets also expose kids to a variety of cultures, utilizing not only classic European hand puppets and marionettes but also Japanese bunraku and Balinese shadow puppets. There are also an assortment of kiddie rides, a favorite being the Jolly Trolly, a 1954 mini railroad that rides through the park and through a tunnel. Other popular rides include the 1956 Wonder-Go-Round; an Alice in Wonderland-themed carousel; and a mini Ferris wheel called Anansi's Magic Web, named for an African children's tale. The park features play areas designed as kid-sized storybook sets, where fairy tales come to life and inspire the imagination. Favorite storybook sets include the Alice in Wonderland Tunnel, Peter Rabbit's Garden, and a Jolly Roger Pirate Ship based on the story of Peter Pan. Address: 699 Bellevue Avenue, Oakland, California
86 locals recommend
Children's Fairyland
699 Bellevue Avenue
86 locals recommend
Adjacent to Lake Merritt's Lakeside Park, Children's Fairyland has been entertaining young children since 1950 with a variety of attractions on the theme of classic fairy tales. This whimsical amusement park is known to have inspired Walt Disney. Fairyland is famous for its Storybook Puppet Theater, the oldest continuously operating puppet theater in the United States. The theater brings puppet dramas to life with charming costumes, colorful sets, and music. The puppets also expose kids to a variety of cultures, utilizing not only classic European hand puppets and marionettes but also Japanese bunraku and Balinese shadow puppets. There are also an assortment of kiddie rides, a favorite being the Jolly Trolly, a 1954 mini railroad that rides through the park and through a tunnel. Other popular rides include the 1956 Wonder-Go-Round; an Alice in Wonderland-themed carousel; and a mini Ferris wheel called Anansi's Magic Web, named for an African children's tale. The park features play areas designed as kid-sized storybook sets, where fairy tales come to life and inspire the imagination. Favorite storybook sets include the Alice in Wonderland Tunnel, Peter Rabbit's Garden, and a Jolly Roger Pirate Ship based on the story of Peter Pan. Address: 699 Bellevue Avenue, Oakland, California
Reinhardt Redwood Regional Park is a second-growth forest on land that was cleared by logging for timber in the mid-1800s. Thanks to the preservation effort of Dr. Aurelia Reinhardt (elected to the park district's first Board of Directors) in the 1930s, the redwood forest was regenerated and opened as a public park in 1939. The park was renamed in 2019 to honor Reinhardt's civil service work. This pristine redwood forest is just a few miles outside of downtown Oakland, and it's worth taking the drive out here to meditate in the peaceful redwood groves. A network of hiking, cycling, and equestrian trails traverses the park. The well-groomed paths invite visitors to amble through the redwoods, and detailed trail maps are available. The magnificent scenery and refreshing environment make this park a paradise for relaxation and nature appreciation. Visitors are awed by the grandeur of the giant redwoods and fragrant evergreens. Many of the stately coastal redwood trees (Sequoia sempervirens) soar to 150 feet, providing welcome shade on warm days. Within the park's 1,833 forested acres are deer, rabbits, and squirrels, as well as rare species like the golden eagle and the Alameda striped racer. Rainbow trout make their way through the park's Redwood Creek on their seasonal migration. The park has restrooms, water fountains, picnic areas including reservable picnic tables, a children's playground, and sites for overnight camping. Address: 7867 Redwood Road, Oakland, California Official site: www.ebparks.org/parks/redwood
210 locals recommend
Redwood Regional Park
7867 Redwood Rd
210 locals recommend
Reinhardt Redwood Regional Park is a second-growth forest on land that was cleared by logging for timber in the mid-1800s. Thanks to the preservation effort of Dr. Aurelia Reinhardt (elected to the park district's first Board of Directors) in the 1930s, the redwood forest was regenerated and opened as a public park in 1939. The park was renamed in 2019 to honor Reinhardt's civil service work. This pristine redwood forest is just a few miles outside of downtown Oakland, and it's worth taking the drive out here to meditate in the peaceful redwood groves. A network of hiking, cycling, and equestrian trails traverses the park. The well-groomed paths invite visitors to amble through the redwoods, and detailed trail maps are available. The magnificent scenery and refreshing environment make this park a paradise for relaxation and nature appreciation. Visitors are awed by the grandeur of the giant redwoods and fragrant evergreens. Many of the stately coastal redwood trees (Sequoia sempervirens) soar to 150 feet, providing welcome shade on warm days. Within the park's 1,833 forested acres are deer, rabbits, and squirrels, as well as rare species like the golden eagle and the Alameda striped racer. Rainbow trout make their way through the park's Redwood Creek on their seasonal migration. The park has restrooms, water fountains, picnic areas including reservable picnic tables, a children's playground, and sites for overnight camping. Address: 7867 Redwood Road, Oakland, California Official site: www.ebparks.org/parks/redwood
Tucked away in a quiet neighborhood, the city-owned Morcom Rose Garden is an enchanting spot that is planted with thousands of roses in all different colors and varieties. The profusion of blooms makes this garden a favorite local spot for photo ops. Roses bloom from early May through October. The garden is especially delightful in springtime and early summer. The peak season runs from the end of May until the end of July. Visitors may take a stroll through the gardens, admiring the landscaping around the stairways and walkways, however on weekends, you may find that some areas are in use; the Oakland Rose Garden is sometimes rented out as a venue for weddings and special events. Address: 700 Jean Street, Oakland, California
41 locals recommend
Morcom Rose Garden
700 Jean Street
41 locals recommend
Tucked away in a quiet neighborhood, the city-owned Morcom Rose Garden is an enchanting spot that is planted with thousands of roses in all different colors and varieties. The profusion of blooms makes this garden a favorite local spot for photo ops. Roses bloom from early May through October. The garden is especially delightful in springtime and early summer. The peak season runs from the end of May until the end of July. Visitors may take a stroll through the gardens, admiring the landscaping around the stairways and walkways, however on weekends, you may find that some areas are in use; the Oakland Rose Garden is sometimes rented out as a venue for weddings and special events. Address: 700 Jean Street, Oakland, California
Located within Reinhardt Redwood Regional Park, the state-of-the-art Chabot Space & Science Center presents fascinating exhibits about planet Earth, the solar system, and the galaxies. The Chabot Space & Science Center features interactive labs and research-level telescopes, which give visitors of all ages the chance to learn about the universe. Exhibits include an exploration of near space, as well as a look at the expansive universe beyond our perception. One of the most thrilling exhibits is an animated real-time representation of the sun, including hot spots and solar flares. The center's Planetarium has a 70-foot full dome, which presents shows using digital projection for stunning, seamless images, along with top-notch digital sound. Audiences will enjoy an engaging simulated stargazing experience, with the sense of being immersed in the night sky. At 1,500 feet above sea level, the Observation Deck is well positioned for viewers to admire the cosmos. The deck features three telescopes, including the historic instrument dating to 1883 that was donated by Anthony Chabot (founder of the center). Address: 10000 Skyline Boulevard, Oakland, California Official site: https://chabotspace.org/
70 locals recommend
Chabot Space & Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
70 locals recommend
Located within Reinhardt Redwood Regional Park, the state-of-the-art Chabot Space & Science Center presents fascinating exhibits about planet Earth, the solar system, and the galaxies. The Chabot Space & Science Center features interactive labs and research-level telescopes, which give visitors of all ages the chance to learn about the universe. Exhibits include an exploration of near space, as well as a look at the expansive universe beyond our perception. One of the most thrilling exhibits is an animated real-time representation of the sun, including hot spots and solar flares. The center's Planetarium has a 70-foot full dome, which presents shows using digital projection for stunning, seamless images, along with top-notch digital sound. Audiences will enjoy an engaging simulated stargazing experience, with the sense of being immersed in the night sky. At 1,500 feet above sea level, the Observation Deck is well positioned for viewers to admire the cosmos. The deck features three telescopes, including the historic instrument dating to 1883 that was donated by Anthony Chabot (founder of the center). Address: 10000 Skyline Boulevard, Oakland, California Official site: https://chabotspace.org/
The African American Museum and Library at Oakland is a unique resource devoted to sharing the historical and cultural experiences of African Americans in Northern California and the Bay Area. More than 160 collections document the stories of prominent families and pioneers, as well as the history of churches and social and political organizations. Designed to serve students and researchers, this reference library boasts a collection of 12,000 volumes about African American history and culture, or works written by African American authors. The Eternal Voices library contains videos that represent over 80 years of African American history in Oakland and the East Bay. Scholars may use the microfilm collection to research special topics such as African American enslavement and Marcus Garvey's Universal Negro Improvement Association, and key historical figures like W.E.B. Du Bois. Address: 659 14th Street, Oakland, California Official site: https://oaklandlibrary.org/aamlo/
African American Museum and Library at Oakland
659 14th Street
The African American Museum and Library at Oakland is a unique resource devoted to sharing the historical and cultural experiences of African Americans in Northern California and the Bay Area. More than 160 collections document the stories of prominent families and pioneers, as well as the history of churches and social and political organizations. Designed to serve students and researchers, this reference library boasts a collection of 12,000 volumes about African American history and culture, or works written by African American authors. The Eternal Voices library contains videos that represent over 80 years of African American history in Oakland and the East Bay. Scholars may use the microfilm collection to research special topics such as African American enslavement and Marcus Garvey's Universal Negro Improvement Association, and key historical figures like W.E.B. Du Bois. Address: 659 14th Street, Oakland, California Official site: https://oaklandlibrary.org/aamlo/
The Dunsmuir-Hellman mansion is nestled in an expansive valley, surrounded by the wooded Oakland Hills. The mansion was built in 1899 for the wealthy coal baron Alexander Dunsmuir. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, this designated Oakland City Landmark was designed by San Francisco architect J. Eugene Freeman in the turn-of-the-century Neoclassical Revival style. The mansion features a Tiffany-style dome, 37 rooms, wood-paneled reception halls, and 10 fireplaces. The estate is set on 50 acres of lawns and has a pond, gazebo, and beautiful gardens. Operated by the city of Oakland's Parks, Recreation & Youth Development department, the Dunsmuir-Hellman Historic Estate is open to the public year-round for visits and guided tours. The estate also hosts themed events throughout the year, including a Father's Day jazz festival and a variety of special activities during the Christmas holiday season. Address: 2960 Peralta Oaks Court, Oakland
6 locals recommend
DUNSMUIR HELLMAN HISTORIC ESTATE
2960 Peralta Oaks Court
6 locals recommend
The Dunsmuir-Hellman mansion is nestled in an expansive valley, surrounded by the wooded Oakland Hills. The mansion was built in 1899 for the wealthy coal baron Alexander Dunsmuir. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, this designated Oakland City Landmark was designed by San Francisco architect J. Eugene Freeman in the turn-of-the-century Neoclassical Revival style. The mansion features a Tiffany-style dome, 37 rooms, wood-paneled reception halls, and 10 fireplaces. The estate is set on 50 acres of lawns and has a pond, gazebo, and beautiful gardens. Operated by the city of Oakland's Parks, Recreation & Youth Development department, the Dunsmuir-Hellman Historic Estate is open to the public year-round for visits and guided tours. The estate also hosts themed events throughout the year, including a Father's Day jazz festival and a variety of special activities during the Christmas holiday season. Address: 2960 Peralta Oaks Court, Oakland

Food scene

Upscale, retro diner serving craft cocktails & inventive American fare with a Japanese touch. Dine-in· Curbside pickup· Delivery
34 locals recommend
Hopscotch
1915 San Pablo Ave
34 locals recommend
Upscale, retro diner serving craft cocktails & inventive American fare with a Japanese touch. Dine-in· Curbside pickup· Delivery
Cozy, great food, they have great service. Service options: Dine-in · Takeout · Delivery
19 locals recommend
The Fat Lady
201 Washington Street
19 locals recommend
Cozy, great food, they have great service. Service options: Dine-in · Takeout · Delivery
Not your typical Thai! they are a Thai New Generation restaurant focusing on bringing you adventurous, bold flavors of traditional and non-traditional dishes
12 locals recommend
Farmhouse Kitchen Thai Cuisine
336 Water St
12 locals recommend
Not your typical Thai! they are a Thai New Generation restaurant focusing on bringing you adventurous, bold flavors of traditional and non-traditional dishes
A great place for very good mexican food.
Molcajete Cocina Mexicana
1734 Webster Street
A great place for very good mexican food.
they do Grubhub delivery Address: 2045 MacArthur Blvd, Oakland, CA 94602 Hours: Open ⋅ Closes 9PM Phone: (510) 531-5737
La Hacienda Restaurant
2045 MacArthur Blvd
they do Grubhub delivery Address: 2045 MacArthur Blvd, Oakland, CA 94602 Hours: Open ⋅ Closes 9PM Phone: (510) 531-5737
Upscale Oaxacan-Californian cuisine offered in a chic, cozy space with culturally inspired accents. Service options: Dine-in · Takeout · Delivery Address: 2135 Franklin St, Oakland, CA 94612 Hours: Open ⋅ Closes 9PM Health & safety: Mask required · Staff required to disinfect surfaces between visits · More details Menu: agaveuptown.com Reservations: resy.com Providers Phone: (510) 288-3668
Agave Uptown
2135 Franklin St
Upscale Oaxacan-Californian cuisine offered in a chic, cozy space with culturally inspired accents. Service options: Dine-in · Takeout · Delivery Address: 2135 Franklin St, Oakland, CA 94612 Hours: Open ⋅ Closes 9PM Health & safety: Mask required · Staff required to disinfect surfaces between visits · More details Menu: agaveuptown.com Reservations: resy.com Providers Phone: (510) 288-3668
Classically styled & festive family-friendly spot offering Mexican standards & full bar service. Service options: Dine-in · Takeout · Delivery Address: 2071 Mountain Blvd, Oakland, CA 94611 Hours: Open ⋅ Closes 10PM · More hours Updated by phone call 11 weeks ago Health & safety: Staff required to disinfect surfaces between visits
El Agavero Restaurant And Tequila Bar
2071 Mountain Blvd
Classically styled & festive family-friendly spot offering Mexican standards & full bar service. Service options: Dine-in · Takeout · Delivery Address: 2071 Mountain Blvd, Oakland, CA 94611 Hours: Open ⋅ Closes 10PM · More hours Updated by phone call 11 weeks ago Health & safety: Staff required to disinfect surfaces between visits
Address: 3459 Champion St, Oakland, CA 94602 Hours: Closed ⋅ Opens 5PM Updated by this business 5 weeks ago Health & safety: Mask required · Staff wear masks · Staff get temperature checks · Staff required to disinfect surfaces between visits · More details Menu: bomberaoakland.com Reservations: resy.com Providers Phone: (510) 452-5900
6 locals recommend
Bombera
3459 Champion Street
6 locals recommend
Address: 3459 Champion St, Oakland, CA 94602 Hours: Closed ⋅ Opens 5PM Updated by this business 5 weeks ago Health & safety: Mask required · Staff wear masks · Staff get temperature checks · Staff required to disinfect surfaces between visits · More details Menu: bomberaoakland.com Reservations: resy.com Providers Phone: (510) 452-5900